Water Content of Foods

Search entire U.S. food database:

  Enter any parts of food name then hit Return to search.

  See also Sugar Content of Foods.


Food NameWater
Water, bottled, POLAND SPRING100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, CALISTOGA100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, CRYSTAL GEYSER100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, NAYA100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, DANNON100.0
Water, bottled, generic100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, EVIAN100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, PEPSI, AQUAFINA100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, DANNON Fluoride To Go100.0
Water, bottled, non-carbonated, DASANI100.0
Water, tap, municipal99.9
Water, tap, drinking99.9
Water, tap, well99.9
Water, bottled, PERRIER99.9
1234567891011121314151617181920...Last

Usage Note

  • Nutrition data are calculated per 100g of food weight.
  • Click on column header to sort foods by name or by nutrient content. Click again to reverse sort order.
  • Click on a number in table footer to go to a particular page.

Choose nutrition data to display

  • Check or uncheck the nutrients in list below to choose which nutrition data to display.
  • Abbreviations: g = gram, mg = milligram, mcg = microgram, kcal = kilocalorie, kJ = kilojoule.






Water

Water is a combination of hydrogen and oxygen. It is the basis for the fluids of the body.

Function of Water

Water makes up more than two-thirds of the weight of the human body (from 75% body weight in infants to 55% in elderly) and is essential for cellular homeostasis and life. Without water, humans would die in a few days. All the cells and organs need water to function.

Water serves as a lubricant. It makes up saliva and the fluids surrounding the joints. Water regulates the body temperature through perspiration. It also helps prevent and relieve constipation by moving food through the intestines.

Food Sources of Water

You get some of the water in your body through the foods you eat. Some of the water is made during the process of metabolism. But drinking water is your main, and best source, of water.

You also get water through liquid foods and beverages, such as soup, milk, and juices. Alcoholic beverages and beverages containing caffeine (such as coffee, tea, and colas) are not the best choices because they have a diuretic effect -- they cause the body to release water.

Dehydration

If you do not drink enough water each day, the body fluids will be out of balance, causing dehydration. When dehydration is severe, it can be life-threatening.

Although there is no research to identify the exact amount of water you should drink, experts usually recommend drinking six to eight 8-ounce glasses of water daily.

Human Water Needs

from US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine

Healthy humans regulate daily water balance remarkably well across their lifespan despite changes in biological development and exposure to stressors on hydration status. Acute or chronic body water deficits result when intakes are reduced or losses increase, but day-to-day hydration is generally well maintained so long as food and fluid are readily available. Total water intake includes drinking water, water in beverages, and water in food. Daily water needs determined from fluid balance, water turnover, or consumption studies provide similar values for a given set of conditions. A daily water intake of 3.7 L for adult men and 2.7 L for adult women meets the needs of the vast majority of persons. However, strenuous physical exercise and heat stress can greatly increase daily water needs, and the individual variability between athletes can be substantial.

Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

Electrolytes are minerals in your body that have an electric charge. They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your body's blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes. Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorine, phosphate and magnesium are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink.

Levels of electrolytes in your body can become too low or too high. That can happen when the amount of water in your body changes, causing dehydration or overhydration. Causes include some medicines, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating or kidney problems. Problems most often occur with levels of sodium, potassium or calcium.

Tips for Increasing Your Fluid Intake by Drinking More Water

Under normal conditions, most people can drink enough fluids to meet their water needs. If you are outside in hot weather for most of the day or doing vigorous activity, you may need to increase your fluid intake.

If you think you're not getting enough water each day, the following tips may help:

  • Carry a water bottle for easy access when you are at work or running errands.
  • Freeze some freezer-safe water bottles. Take one with you for ice-cold water all day long.
  • Choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages. This tip can also help with weight management. Substituting water for one 20-ounce sugar-sweetened soda will save you about 240 calories.
  • Choose water instead of other beverages when eating out. Generally, you will save money and reduce calories.
  • Give your water a little pizzazz by adding a wedge of lime or lemon. This may improve the taste, and you just might drink more water than you usually do.

Partner Websites

Please bookmark our partner websites to use when any of our nutrition calculators is not available or overloaded.