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Tin Content of Foods

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Food NameTin
Beer, ale0.0
Beer, bitter0.0
Beer, lager0.0
Beer, draught0.0
Tea, regular, brewed from leaf or teabags, without milk0.0
Juice, orange, added vitamin c0.0
Juice, orange, sweetened, no added vitamin C0.0
Juice, orange, added calcium, & vitamins A, C & folate0.0
Juice, orange, sweetened, added vitamin C0.0
Juice concentrate, orange0.0
Juice, orange, shelf stable, added vitamin c0.0
Juice, orange, no added vitamin c0.0
Pasta, white wheat flour, boiled from dry, with added salt0.6
Pasta, white wheat flour, boiled from dry, no added salt0.6
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Tin

Tin is a chemical element with symbol Sn (for Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50.

Tin in foods and human diet

Human diet is the main source of tin intake by man. Nearly all the tin in modern diet is associated with canned food. Canned tomatoes, tomato products, pineapple, pears and similar fruits contain the highest concentrations of tin. Average dietary tin intakes in the modern diet are about 3 mg/day and have been falling.

Toxicity of tin and its compounds

information from the National Institutes of Health

Tinplate is light gauge, steel sheet or strip, coated on both sides with commercially pure tin and has been used for well over a hundred years as a robust form of food packaging. Altogether, about 25,000 million food cans are produced and filled in Europe per annum, about 20% of these having plain internal (unlacquered) tin-coated steel bodies. Worldwide, the total for food packaging is approximately 80,000 million cans. Tinplate is also extensively used for the production of beverage cans. Europe produces and fills over 15,000 million tinplate beverage cans per annum all of which are internally lacquered. The use of tinplate for food and beverage packaging, will result in some tin dissolving into the food content, particularly when plain uncoated internal surfaces are used.

Inorganic tin salts are poorly absorbed and rapidly excreted in the faeces; as a result they have a low toxicity. Only about 5 per cent is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, widely distributed in the body, then excreted by the kidney. Some tin is deposited in lung and bone. Some tin salts can cause renal necrosis after parenteral doses. Mutagenic studies on metallic tin and its compounds have been negative. Long-term animal carcinogenic studies have shown fewer malignant tumours in animals exposed to tin than in controls.

Human volunteers developed mild signs of toxicity with tin, given in fruit juices, at a concentration of 1400 mg per litre. The WHO 1973 permissible limit for tin in tinned food is 250 micrograms per kg. The adult daily intake of tin was about 17 mg per day in 1940, but it has now decreased to about 3.5 mg, due to improvements in technique of tinning with enamel overcoat and crimped lids to minimize exposure to tin and lead solder. This level is well below the level of 5-7 mg per kg body weight shown to give rise to toxic symptoms.

Tin deficiency has not been described in man. Amounts in excess of 130 mg per day have been shown to accumulate in liver and kidneys. Many of the organotin compounds are toxic; the most toxic being trimethyltin and triethyltin, which are well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Most of the other alkyl and aryltin compounds are poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and are therefore less toxic when given orally than when given parenterally. The main results of toxicity are skin and eye irritation; cholangitis of the lower biliary tract, and later hepatotoxicity; and neurotoxicity, which has been shown to be due to intramyelin oedema induced by triethyltin, and neuronal necrosis caused by trimethyltin.

Many of the organotin compounds affect mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and alter membranes, but the contribution of these biochemical and membrane effects in the cause of intramyelin oedema and neuronal necrosis has not been fully clarified. Widespread degeneration results, especially with trimethyltin. Peripheral neuropathy has not been reported as occurring with either inorganic or organic tin in humans. Certain dialkyltin compounds have been shown to cause adverse effects on cell-mediated immunity, specifically on the T cell lymphocyte. Experimental studies have failed to reveal any evidence of carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, or teratogenicity. Recent studies suggest that tin compounds exhibit some antitumour activity and may have a future role in cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy, and in controlling hyperbilirubinaemia.

Foods High in Tin Content

Tin contents are in microgram per 100 grams of food weight or 100 mL of liquid food.


Tin
Food Name

700.0
Baked beans, canned in tomato sauce, salt reduced

700.0
Baked beans, canned in tomato sauce

457.8
Pea, green, canned in brine, boiled, drained

89.6
Cheese, feta (fetta), sheep & cows milk

22.7
Bean, red, kidney, canned, drained

19.6
Tuna, canned in brine, drained

19.6
Tuna, canned in water, added salt, drained

11.1
Crabmeat, canned in brine, drained

9.8
Crabmeat, canned in brine

6.0
Sausage, beef, fried

6.0
Sausage, beef, grilled

5.6
Cake, chocolate, iced, commercial

2.4
Venison, mince, premium, dry fried

2.3
Chocolate, milk, with added milk solids

1.9
Pie, savoury, meat, commercial, individual size

1.9
Pie, savoury, meat, commercial, party size

1.9
Pie, savoury, meat, commercial, family size

1.7
Venison, mince, premium, raw

1.5
Peanut, milk chocolate-coated

1.4
Bread, from white flour, added omega-3 polyunsaturates, toasted

1.4
Bread, from white flour, toasted

1.2
Nut, peanut, without skin, roasted, with oil, unsalted

1.2
Nut, peanut, without skin, roasted, with oil, salted

1.2
Bread, from white flour

1.2
Bread, from white flour, added omega-3 polyunsaturates

1.2
Chicken, drumstick, lean, baked without oil

1.2
Nut, peanut, with skin, roasted, with oil, salted

0.9
Yogurt, low fat (<0.5%), strawberry pieces or flavored

0.9
Margarine spread, monounsaturated (70% fat), reduced salt (sodium = 380mg/100g)


Tin
Food Name

0.9
Margarine spread, monounsaturated, reduced fat (55% fat) & salt (sodium = 380 mg/100g)

0.9
Yogurt, regular fat (~3%), strawberry pieces or flavored

0.9
Margarine spread, polyunsaturated (70% fat), reduced salt (sodium = 380 mg/100g)

0.9
Margarine spread, monounsaturated (70% fat)

0.7
Bread, from wholemeal flour, toasted

0.7
Venison, stir fry strips, lean, dry fried

0.7
Cabbage, bok choy, stir-fried without oil

0.6
Peach, unpeeled, raw

0.6
Venison, leg medallion, lean, dry fried

0.6
Sprout, alfalfa, raw

0.6
Pasta, white wheat flour, boiled from dry, with added salt

0.6
Venison, diced, lean, dry fried

0.6
Pasta, white wheat flour, boiled from dry, no added salt

0.6
Bread, from wholemeal flour

0.6
Pork, butterfly steak, separable lean, grilled

0.5
Cabbage, bok choy, raw

0.5
Venison, stir fry strips, lean, raw

0.5
Venison, diced, lean, raw

0.5
Ham, leg, lean & fat

0.5
Venison, leg medallion, lean, raw

0.5
Ham, leg, lean

0.5
Ham steak, raw

0.4
Capsicum, green, raw

0.4
Capsicum, green, stir-fried without oil

0.4
Capsicum, red, raw

0.4
Capsicum, red, stir-fried without oil

0.4
Lamb, liver, grilled

0.3
Lettuce, cos, raw

0.3
Chiko roll, deep fried

0.3
Lettuce, mignonette, raw

0.3
Lettuce, iceberg, raw

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