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Foods without Copper

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Food NameCaloriesCopper
Butter, salted7170
Cream substitute, liquid, with hydrogenated vegetable oil and soy protein1360
Fat, beef tallow9020
Lard9020
Salad dressing, sesame seed dressing, regular4430
Salad dressing, thousand island, commercial, regular3700
Salad dressing, thousand island dressing, reduced fat1950
Shortening, household, soybean (partially hydrogenated)-cottonseed (partially hydrogenated)8840
Oil, soybean, salad or cooking, (partially hydrogenated)8840
Oil, wheat germ8840
Oil, peanut, salad or cooking8840
Oil, soybean, salad or cooking8840
Oil, coconut8620
Oil, olive, salad or cooking8840
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  • Abbreviations: g = gram, mg = milligram, mcg = microgram, kcal = kilocalorie, kJ = kilojoule.






Low-Copper Diet for Wilson Disease

information from the National Institutes of Health

Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need a small amount of copper from food to stay healthy. Too much copper is poisonous.

Normally, your liver releases extra copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and it releases the copper directly into your bloodstream. This can cause damage to your brain, kidneys, and eyes.

Wilson disease is present at birth, but symptoms usually start between ages 5 and 35. It first attacks the liver, the central nervous system or both. The most characteristic sign is a rusty brown ring around the cornea of the eye. A physical exam and laboratory tests can diagnose it.

Treatment is with drugs to remove the extra copper from your body. You need to take medicine and follow a low-copper diet for the rest of your life.
Don't eat shellfish or liver, as these foods may contain high levels of copper. At the beginning of treatment, you'll also need to avoid chocolate, mushrooms, and nuts. Also don't take multivitamins that contain copper.
As your signs and symptoms recede and the copper levels in your body drop, you may be able to include some copper-containing foods in your diet.

Copper in Tap Water

During the first year of your treatment for Wilson's disease, it is crucial to restrict the amount of copper in your diet. Have your drinking water checked for copper content if you have copper pipes in your home or if your water comes from a well. Most municipal water systems don't contain high levels of copper. If you have copper pipes, run the tap for several seconds before collecting water for drinking or cooking.

Copper in Foods Online Resources

We provide 3 online copper content of foods databases: one from the UK and two from the US.

Foods with High Copper Content

List of foods with highest copper content to be avoided in Wilson's disease diet:



Copper (mg)
Foods High in Copper Content (100 g)

14.47
Beef liver, fried

14.16
Beef liver, braised

9.38
Liver dumpling

8.99
Liver, beef or calves, and onions

7.17
Squid, dried

7.17
Oysters, smoked

4.85
Oysters, canned

4.79
Oysters, cooked

4.73
Algae, dried

4.69
Oysters, steamed

4.45
Oysters, raw

4.26
Oysters, floured or breaded, fried

4.17
Oysters, baked or broiled

4.08
Sesame seeds, whole seed

4.07
Textured vegetable protein, dry

3.85
Oysters, battered, fried

3.79
Cocoa powder, not reconstituted (no dry milk)

3.36
Seaweed, dried

3.04
Dynatrim, meal replacement, powder

2.92
Soybean meal

2.60
Instant breakfast, powder, sweetened with low calorie sweetener, not reconstituted

2.59
Oyster fritter

2.47
Meal replacement, protein type, milk-based, powdered, not reconstituted

2.28
Squid, baked, broiled

2.25
Meal replacement, protein type, milk- and soy-based, powdered, not reconstituted

2.22
Cashew nuts, dry roasted

2.21
Oysters Rockefeller

2.19
Cashew butter


Copper (mg)
Foods High in Copper Content (100 g)

2.11
Oyster sauce (white sauce-based)

2.07
Squid, canned

2.06
Squid, steamed or boiled

2.04
Cashew nuts, roasted (assume salted)

2.04
Cashew nuts, roasted, without salt

2.04
Cashew nuts

1.92
Lobster, cooked

1.92
Lobster, canned

1.92
Lobster, steamed or boiled

1.92
Lobster, without shell, steamed or boiled

1.89
Squid, breaded, fried

1.89
Squid, raw

1.87
Lobster, baked or broiled

1.83
Sunflower seeds, hulled, dry roasted

1.82
Squid, pickled

1.80
Sunflower seeds, hulled, roasted, salted

1.80
Sunflower seeds, hulled, roasted, without salt

1.80
Mixed nuts, roasted, without peanuts

1.76
Cashew nuts, honey-roasted

1.75
Sunflower seeds, hulled, unroasted

1.74
Brazil nuts

1.73
Filberts, hazelnuts

1.71
Peanut butter, vitamin and mineral fortified

1.69
Mixed nuts

1.67
Lobster, battered, fried

1.67
Chives, dried or dehydrated

1.66
Mixed nuts, roasted, with peanuts

1.65
Octopus, dried

1.64
Snails, steamed or poached


Copper (mg)
Foods High in Copper Content (100 g)

1.61
Lobster, floured or breaded, fried

1.61
Sesame butter (tahini) (made from kernels)

1.61
Sesame paste (sesame butter made from whole seeds)

1.60
Bee pollen

1.60
Protein powder

1.59
Walnuts

1.58
Mixed nuts, in shell

1.57
Mixed seeds

1.54
Protein supplement, powdered

1.54
Protein diet powder with soy and casein

1.50
Lobster with butter sauce (mixture)

1.48
Nutrient supplement, milk-based, high protein, powdered, not reconstituted

1.46
Oyster stew

1.46
Protein supplement, milk-based, powdered, not reconstituted

1.46
Sesame seeds

1.45
Mixed nuts, honey-roasted, with peanuts

1.43
Instant breakfast, powder, not reconstituted

1.42
Tomatoes, red, dried

1.39
Pumpkin and/or squash seeds, hulled, unroasted

1.38
Pumpkin and/or squash seeds, hulled, roasted, salted

1.38
Pumpkin and/or squash seeds, hulled, roasted, without salt

1.38
Lobster with bread stuffing, baked

1.37
Sesame sauce

1.33
Pistachio nuts

1.32
Pine nuts (Pignolias)

1.32
Walnuts, honey-roasted

1.30
Peanuts, roasted, without salt

1.28
Oyster pie

1.28
Mixed nuts, dry roasted


Copper (mg)
Foods High in Copper Content (100 g)

1.22
Flax seeds

1.20
Pecans

1.18
Nut mixture with dried fruit and seeds

1.17
Dressing with oysters

1.17
Nuts, chocolate covered, not almonds or peanuts

1.17
Almonds, dry roasted (assume salted)

1.17
Almonds, dry roasted, without salt

1.16
Topping, chocolate, hard coating

1.14
Optimum Slim, Nature's Path

1.13
Optimum, Nature's Path

1.13
White potato skins, with adhering flesh, fried

1.11
Almonds

1.11
Almonds, unroasted

1.09
PowerBar (fortified high energy bar)

1.06
High calorie milk beverage, powder, not reconstituted

1.04
All-Bran

1.02
Lobster creole, Puerto Rican style (Langosta a la criolla)

1.00
Wheat bran, unprocessed

1.00
Papad (Indian appetizer), grilled or broiled

0.97
Almonds, chocolate covered

0.96
Scallops, meatless, breaded, fried (made with meat substitute)

0.96
Almonds, roasted

0.95
Sesame Crunch (Sahadi)

0.94
Malt-O-Meal Puffed Rice

0.94
Rice, puffed

0.93
Vegetarian, fillet

0.93
Fish stick, meatless

0.92
Bran and malted flour cereal (Includes: 100% Bran)

0.91
Luncheon slice, meatless-beef, chicken, salami or turkey

0.90
Almond butter

0.90
Lobster newburg

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