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Monounsaturated Fat Content of Foods

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Food NameMonounsat. FatPolyunsat. FatSaturated FatTotal Fat
Oil, sunflower, high oleic (70% and over)◊  83.689◊  3.7989.859100.00
Oil, hazelnut◊  78.000◊  10.2007.400100.00
Oil, safflower, salad or cooking, high oleic (primary safflower oil of commerce)◊  75.221◊  12.8207.541100.00
Shortening frying (heavy duty), soybean (hydrogenated), linoleic (less than 1%)◊  73.700◊  0.40021.100100.00
Oil, olive, salad or cooking◊  72.961◊  10.52313.808100.00
Oil, industrial, canola, high oleic◊  72.734◊  15.7856.787100.00
Oil, vegetable, Natreon canola, high stability, non trans, high oleic (70%)◊  71.991◊  17.0986.511100.00
Oil, industrial, canola (partially hydrogenated) oil for deep fat frying◊  71.075◊  14.03810.117100.00
Shortening, industrial, soy (partially hydrogenated ) for baking and confections◊  71.023◊  5.40018.788100.00
Oil, avocado◊  70.554◊  13.48611.560100.00
Oil, almond◊  69.900◊  17.4008.200100.00
Oil, canola◊  63.276◊  28.1427.365100.00
Oil, industrial, canola with antifoaming agent, principal uses salads, woks and light frying◊  62.093◊  25.5887.615100.00
Oil, industrial, soy ( partially hydrogenated), all purpose◊  61.248◊  9.29524.750100.00
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Usage Note

  • All fat values are in grams and calculated per 100g of food weight.
  • Click on column header to sort foods by name or by each fat content.

How Fat Content of Foods Are Rated

  • Saturated fat: saturated fat is considered bad for health. Foods with high saturated fat content are highlighted in red. These are further marked with ◊ (bad), ◊◊ (worse) or ◊◊◊ (worst) rating based on the amount of saturated fat in a food.

  • Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat: these fats are considered generally good for health in moderate quantity. Foods high in unsaturated fat relative to total fat and saturated fat contents are highlighted in green and marked with in the unsaturated fats columns.

  • Total fat: foods low in total fat are highlighted with a green heart .
Rule of thumb: if you are on a low fat diet, choose foods highlighted in green and avoid those in red.

Fat

information from the National Institutes of Health

Fats are organic compounds that are made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. They are a source of energy in foods. Fats belong to a group of substances called lipids, and come in liquid or solid form. All fats are combinations of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

Unsaturated Fat

Fats that help to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats. However, unsaturated fats have a lot of calories, so you still need to limit them. Most (but not all) liquid vegetable oils are unsaturated. (The exceptions include coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils.) There are two types of unsaturated fats:

  • Monounsaturated fats: Examples include olive and canola oils. Monounsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature and get thicker when chilled.
  • Polyunsaturated fats: Examples include fish, safflower, sunflower, corn, and soybean oils. Polyunsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature and stay liquid when chilled.

What are Monounsaturated Fatty Acids?

Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are considered a healthy type of fat. If your diet includes unsaturated fats (such as MUFAs and polyunsaturated fats) instead of saturated fats and trans fats, you may gain certain health benefits.

Consuming monounsaturated fatty acids may help lower your risk of heart disease by improving risk factors. For instance, MUFAs may lower your total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels but maintain or increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.

MUFAs may also help normalize blood clotting. And some research shows that MUFAs may also benefit insulin levels and blood sugar control, which can be especially helpful if you have type 2 diabetes.

Monounsaturated Fat in Diabetes Diet

Study comparing use of monounsaturated fat in diabetes diet vs. a carbohydrate-rich diet found that glucose concentrations are lower in the MUFA diet. Blood pressure was also found to be lower. There were no major differences with respect to lipid concentrations. HDL-cholesterol levels tended to be higher after a MUFA-rich diet. In type-1 diabetic patients, the number of circulating big VLDL particles was greater after a MUFA diet than after a carbohydrate-rich diet.

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Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids are protective against cardiovascular diseases

Over 50 years of research has sought to define the role dietary fat plays in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Although optimal dietary fat quantity has been keenly pursued over past decades, attention has recently centered on the value of dietary fat quality. Due to existing and emerging research on health attributes of MUFA rich diets, and to the low prevalence of chronic disease in populations consuming MUFA rich Mediterranean diets, national dietary guidelines are increasingly recommending dietary MUFA, primarily at the expense of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Consumption of dietary MUFA promotes healthy blood lipid profiles, mediates blood pressure, improves insulin sensitivity and regulates glucose levels. Moreover, newer data suggest a role for preferential oxidation and metabolism of dietary MUFA, influencing body composition and ameliorating the risk of obesity. Mounting epidemiological and human clinical trial data continue to demonstrate the cardioprotective activity of the MUFA content of dietary fat.

Read more ...

List of Foods Highest in Monounsaturated Fat

Monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content is in grams per 100 grams of food weight.



MUFA (g)
Foods Highest in Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (100 g)

74.6
Safflower oil

73.0
Olive oil

69.9
Almond oil

59.3
Macadamia nuts, unroasted

59.3
Macadamia nuts, roasted

58.9
Rapeseed oil

55.3
Canola and soybean oil

46.2
Peanut oil

45.7
Filberts, hazelnuts

45.1
Shortening, animal

45.1
Lard

44.6
Shortening, NS as to vegetable or animal

44.6
Shortening, vegetable

42.3
Fat back, cooked

41.8
Corn and canola oil

41.2
Animal fat or drippings

40.8
Pecans

40.7
Canola, soybean and sunflower oil

40.2
Feta Cheese Dressing

39.9
Margarine-like spread, made with yogurt, stick, salted

39.7
Sesame oil

39.0
Margarine, stick, unsalted

38.4
Almond butter

37.2
Margarine, stick, salted

36.5
Salt pork, cooked

36.1
Margarine, tub, salted

36.1
Margarine, whipped, tub, salted

36.1
Margarine, tub, unsalted

36.1
Margarine, whipped, tub, unsalted


MUFA (g)
Foods Highest in Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (100 g)

34.8
Almonds, roasted

33.8
Vegetable oil

33.7
Almonds, dry roasted (assume salted)

33.7
Almonds, dry roasted, without salt

33.1
Mixed nuts, roasted, without peanuts

33.1
Margarine-like spread, liquid, salted

32.8
Butter-margarine blend, tub, salted

32.8
Butter-vegetable oil blend

32.2
Almonds

32.2
Almonds, unroasted

32.0
Mixed nuts

31.8
Butter-margarine blend, stick, unsalted

31.7
Mixed nuts, roasted, with peanuts

31.4
Mixed nuts, dry roasted

30.7
Pesto sauce

30.7
Almonds, honey-roasted

29.1
Cashew butter

29.1
Butter-margarine blend, stick, salted

28.7
Ghee, clarified butter

28.6
Pork, dehydrated, oriental style

28.1
Margarine, liquid, salted

27.6
Sugared pecans (sugar and egg white coating)

27.6
Mixed nuts, honey-roasted, with peanuts

27.6
Corn oil

27.4
Margarine-like spread, stick, salted

27.4
Margarine-like spread, stick, unsalted

27.3
Cashew nuts, dry roasted

26.6
Almonds, chocolate covered

25.9
Peanuts

25.9
Peanuts, roasted, salted

25.9
Peanuts, in shell (shell not eaten)


MUFA (g)
Foods Highest in Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (100 g)

25.9
Cashew nuts, roasted, without salt

25.9
Cashew nuts

25.9
Cashew nuts, roasted (assume salted)

24.6
Peanuts, dry roasted, without salt

24.6
Peanuts, dry roasted, salted

24.6
Peanut butter, vitamin and mineral fortified

24.5
Brazil nuts

24.5
Lemon-butter sauce

24.5
Peanuts, roasted, without salt

24.2
Pistachio nuts

23.7
Peanut butter

23.7
Peanut butter, low sodium

23.6
Peanut butter, reduced sodium

23.4
Butter, whipped, tub, salted

23.3
Soybean oil

22.8
Rice meal fritter, Puerto Rican style (Almojabana)

22.8
Walnut oil

22.6
Peanuts, honey-roasted

22.3
Cashew nuts, honey-roasted

22.2
Mixed nuts, in shell

21.7
Nuts, chocolate covered, not almonds or peanuts

21.4
Pickled green bananas, Puerto Rican style (Guineos verdes en escabeche)

21.0
Butter, whipped, stick, salted

21.0
Butter, stick, unsalted

21.0
Butter, stick, salted

21.0
Butter

21.0
Butter, whipped, tub, unsalted

21.0
Butter, whipped, stick, unsalted

20.8
Vegetable oil-butter spread, reduced calorie, stick, salted

20.6
Shrimp chips (tapioca base)

20.5
Celery seed dressing


MUFA (g)
Foods Highest in Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (100 g)

20.5
Soybean and sunflower oil

20.3
Table fat

20.3
Margarine

20.3
Sesame paste (sesame butter made from whole seeds)

20.3
Sesame butter (tahini) (made from kernels)

20.2
Flaxseed oil

19.7
Vegetable oil-butter spread, reduced calorie, tub, salted

19.6
Mayonnaise, regular

19.5
Sunflower oil

19.0
Pepperoni

18.9
Margarine-like spread, reduced calorie, about 40% fat, stick, salted

18.8
Beef, shortribs, cooked

18.8
Beef, shortribs, cooked, lean and fat eaten

18.8
Pine nuts (Pignolias)

18.8
Sesame seeds, whole seed

18.5
Pork bacon, smoked or cured, lower sodium

18.5
Bacon, cooked

18.5
Bacon or side pork, fresh, cooked

18.5
Pork, cracklings, cooked

18.5
Pork bacon, smoked or cured, cooked

18.5
Pork bacon, NS as to fresh, smoked or cured, cooked

18.4
Vegetable oil-butter spread, tub, salted

18.4
Chorizos

18.1
Sesame seeds

18.1
Topping, milk chocolate with cereal

18.0
Mayonnaise-type salad dressing, cholesterol-free

18.0
Almond paste (Marzipan paste)

17.8
Cottonseed oil

17.7
Creamy dressing, made with sour cream and/or buttermilk and oil