DietGrail.com

























View sample pages!



Glycemic Index & Glycemic Load of Foods

Search entire online 3,055-food database:

  Enter any parts of food name then hit Return to search.

   Buy Glycemic Index of 3,770 Foods for Windows!


Food NameGlycemic LoadGlycemic Index 
Milk, cow's, fluid, whole1.227.0
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, whole1.431.0
Milk, calcium fortified, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, 2% fat1.429.5
Milk, cow's, fluid, acidophilus, 2% fat1.429.5
Milk, cow's, fluid, 1% fat1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, skim or nonfat, 0.5% or less butterfat1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, 1% fat1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, 1% fat, fortified with calcium1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, nonfat1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, nonfat, fortified with calcium1.632.0
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, 2% fat1.429.5
Milk, cow's, fluid, lactose reduced, whole1.431.0
Buttermilk, fluid, 1% fat1.531.0
1234567891011121314151617181920...Last

Usage Note

  • Glycemic load values in table are calculated per 100g of food.
  • This online glycemic index database has GI data for 3,055 food items. Our Glycemic Index & Glycemic Load software for Windows has GI and GL data for 3,770 food items.
  • Glycemic indices are color coded: Red for High GI, Green for low GI and Yellow for medium GI foods with gradual gradation between GI values. This means, for example, among the high GI foods, those with lower GI ratings will be less red and more yellow. Similarly with low GI foods. Those with lower GI are coded with greener color.
  • Click on column header to sort foods by name or by Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load.
  • Pie chart shows relative contributions to total calories from carbohydrate, protein and fat (and alcohol, if exists).

Glycemic Index Info from National Institutes of Health

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of the glycemic effect of carbohydrate in a particular food compared to an equivalent amount of carbohydrate in a standard amount of glucose or white bread.
The Glycemic Load (GL) of a serving of a specific food is simply the product of its GI (divided by 100) and the grams of carbohydrate from a single serving of that food. It is important to note that a food with a high GI may not always have a high GL. This can happen if the food has very little carbohydrate (for example, meat) or if the food is consumed in small quantities.

Foods with a high glycemic index release glucose quickly and cause a rapid rise in blood glucose. Foods with a low glycemic index release glucose slowly into the blood.

Glycemic Index Info from Harvard School of Public Health

Carbohydrates and the Glycemic Index

Dividing carbohydrates into simple and complex makes sense on a chemical level. But it doesn't do much to explain what happens to different kinds of carbohydrates inside the body. For example, the starch in white bread and French-fried potatoes clearly qualifies as a complex carbohydrate. Yet the body converts this starch to blood sugar nearly as fast as it processes pure glucose. Fructose (fruit sugar) is a simple carbohydrate, but it has a minimal effect on blood sugar.
A new system, called the glycemic index, aims to classify carbohydrates based on how quickly and how high they boost blood sugar compared to pure glucose. Foods with a high glycemic index, like white bread, cause rapid spikes in blood sugar. Foods with a low glycemic index, like whole oats, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. Foods with a score of 70 or higher are defined as having a high glycemic index; those with a score of 55 or below have a low glycemic index.


Carbohydrates and the Glycemic Load

Researchers have developed a way to classify foods that takes into account both the amount of carbohydrate in the food and the impact of that carbohydrate on blood sugar levels. This measure is called the glycemic load. A food's glycemic load is determined by multiplying its glycemic index by the amount of carbohydrate it contains. For good health, choose foods that have a low or medium glycemic load, and limit foods that have a high glycemic load.

Purchase Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Foods

A printed edition of Diet Grail's Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Foods can be purchased on Amazon or at CreateSpace. A Kindle ebook edition is also available on Amazon. These Amazon editions have GI and GL data for 3,770 food items as opposed to data for 3,055 foods at this website.

We have also released a version of Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Foods for Windows for purchase and immediate download. This Windows software version also has GI and GL data for 3,770 food items as opposed to data for only 3,055 foods at this website. Screenshots and details are at our partner website:

Glycemic index: overview of implications in health and disease from the National Institutes of Health

The glycemic index concept is an extension of the fiber hypothesis, suggesting that fiber consumption reduces the rate of nutrient influx from the gut. The glycemic index has particular relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with central obesity and insulin resistance. Early studies showed that starchy carbohydrate foods have very different effects on blood glucose and insulin responses in healthy and diabetic subjects, depending on the rate of digestion.
Case-control studies have also shown positive associations between dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon and breast cancers. Despite inconsistencies in the data, sufficient, positive findings have emerged to suggest that the dietary glycemic index is of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

Glycemic index and obesity

Although weight loss can be achieved by any means of energy restriction, current dietary guidelines have not prevented weight regain or population-level increases in obesity and overweight. Many high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets may be counterproductive to weight control because they markedly increase postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Many high-carbohydrate foods common to Western diets produce a high glycemic response, promoting postprandial carbohydrate oxidation at the expense of fat oxidation, thus altering fuel partitioning in a way that may be conducive to body fat gain. In contrast, diets based on low-fat foods that produce a low glycemic response (low-GI foods) may enhance weight control because they promote satiety, minimize postprandial insulin secretion, and maintain insulin sensitivity. This hypothesis is supported by several intervention studies in humans in which energy-restricted diets based on low-GI foods produced greater weight loss than did equivalent diets based on high-GI foods. In a study of healthy pregnant women, a high-GI diet was associated with greater weight at term than was a nutrient-balanced, low-GI diet.

Glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of type 2 diabetes

The possibility that high, long-term intake of carbohydrates that are rapidly absorbed as glucose may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes has been a long-standing controversy. In large prospective epidemiologic studies, both the glycemic index and the glycemic load (the glycemic index multiplied by the amount of carbohydrate) of the overall diet have been associated with a greater risk of type 2 diabetes in both men and women. Conversely, a higher intake of cereal fiber has been consistently associated with lower diabetes risk. In diabetic patients, evidence from medium-term studies suggests that replacing high-glycemic-index carbohydrates with a low-glycemic-index forms will improve glycemic control and, among persons treated with insulin, will reduce hypoglycemic episodes. These dietary changes, have also been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and can be an appropriate component of recommendations for an overall healthy diet.

Does Low-Glycemic Index and Low-Glycemic Load Diet Work?

Study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association finds that there is increasing evidence that low-glycemic load diets could prevent diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Adherence to a low-glycemic load diet (when it satisfies dietary recommendations related to fat, portion, etc.) seems prudent.
Read more...


Vegetables with Highest Glycemic Index

Below is a list of the 100 vegetables having the highest glycemic indices.



Vegetables with High Glycemic Index Glycemic Index

Parsnips, cooked, fat added in cooking 97.0

Parsnips, cooked, fat not added in cooking 97.0

White potato, from dry, mashed, made with milk, fat and egg 85.0

White potato, from dry, mashed 85.0

White potato, from complete dry mix, mashed, made with water 85.0

White potato, from dry, mashed, made with milk, no fat 85.0

White potato, from dry, mashed, made with milk and fat 85.0

White potato, from fresh, mashed, made with milk 79.3

White potato, mashed 79.3

White potato, from fresh, mashed, made with milk and fat 79.3

White potato, from fresh, mashed, made with fat 79.3

White potato, from fresh, mashed, not made with milk or fat 79.3

White potato, from fresh, mashed 79.3

White potato, from fresh, mashed, made with milk, fat and cheese 79.3

White potato, hash brown, from dry mix 75.0

White potato, french fries 75.0

White potato, french fries, from fresh, deep fried 75.0

White potato, french fries, from frozen, oven baked 75.0

Squash, winter type, baked, fat added in cooking, no sugar added in cooking 75.0

White potato, french fries, from frozen, deep fried 75.0

White potato, french fries, breaded or battered 75.0

Squash, winter type, baked, no fat or sugar added in cooking 75.0

White potato, home fries 75.0

White potato, home fries, with green or red peppers and onions 75.0

White potato, hash brown 75.0

Pumpkin, cooked, from canned, fat not added in cooking 75.0

White potato, hash brown, from frozen 75.0

White potato, hash brown, with cheese 75.0

Pumpkin, cooked, from fresh, fat not added in cooking 75.0

Unique online nutrient databases

Visit our partner website health-diet.us for additional nutrient data: fructose, glucose, sucrose, lactose, trans fat, fluoride, as well as a complete set of French nutrient database.

Web Apps for Perlmutter's Grain Brain

Directory of Grain Brain system's web apps: Perlmutter's Grain Brain Food Lists.



Vegetables with High Glycemic Index Glycemic Index

Pumpkin, cooked, fat not added in cooking 75.0

Squash, winter type, mashed, fat added in cooking, no sugar added in cooking 75.0

Pumpkin, cooked, from fresh, fat added in cooking 75.0

Calabaza (Spanish pumpkin), cooked 75.0

Squash, winter type, mashed, no fat or sugar added in cooking 75.0

Squash, winter type, mashed, NS as to fat or sugar added in cooking 75.0

White potato, hash brown, from fresh 75.0

White potato, baked, peel eaten, fat added in cooking 72.5

White potato, roasted, fat not added in cooking 72.5

White potato, roasted 72.5

White potato, roasted, fat added in cooking 72.5

White potato skins, with adhering flesh, baked 72.5

White potato, baked, peel eaten, fat not added in cooking 72.5

White potato, baked, peel eaten 72.5

White potato, baked, peel not eaten 72.5

Squash, winter, souffle 72.1

Turnip, cooked, from fresh 72.0

Rutabaga, cooked, fat added in cooking 72.0

Rutabaga, cooked, fat not added in cooking 72.0

Turnip, cooked, fat added in cooking 72.0

Turnip, raw 72.0

Turnip, cooked, from fresh, fat not added in cooking 72.0

Turnip, cooked, from fresh, fat added in cooking 72.0

Turnip, cooked, fat not added in cooking 72.0

Squash, winter type, baked, NS as to fat or sugar added in cooking 71.3

Squash, winter type, mashed, fat and sugar added in cooking 71.3

Squash, winter type, baked, no fat added in cooking, sugar added in cooking 71.3

Squash, winter type, baked, fat and sugar added in cooking 71.3

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel eaten, stuffed with broccoli and cheese sauce 70.1

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel eaten, stuffed with cheese 70.1

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel eaten, stuffed with sour cream 69.7

Popular diets and food databases for weight control



Vegetables with High Glycemic Index Glycemic Index

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel eaten, NS as to topping 69.7

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten 69.5

White potato, cooked, with cheese 69.3

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with cheese 69.2

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with broccoli and cheese sauce 69.2

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with chicken, broccoli and cheese sauce 69.2

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with bacon and cheese 69.2

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel eaten, stuffed with meat in cream sauce 68.8

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with sour cream 68.7

White potato, scalloped 68.6

White potato, scalloped, with ham 68.6

Potato salad, German style 68.2

Breadfruit, cooked, fat not added in cooking 68.0

White potato, cooked, with sauce, NS as to sauce 67.3

White potato, stuffed, baked, peel not eaten, stuffed with chili 66.8

White potato, boiled, with peel, fat not added in cooking 66.2

Beets with Harvard sauce 66.2

White potato, boiled, without peel, fat not added in cooking 66.2

White potato, boiled, without peel, fat added in cooking 66.2

White potato 66.2

White potato, boiled, without peel 66.2

Pea soup, prepared with water 66.0

Pea soup 66.0

Pea soup, canned, low sodium, prepared with water 66.0

Potato salad 65.9

Potato salad with egg 65.8

Beets, pickled 65.5

Stewed potatoes with tomatoes 65.4

Beets, cooked, from fresh 64.0

Beets, cooked, fat added in cooking 64.0

Beets, cooked, from canned, fat not added in cooking 64.0

Notice

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Common Fresh Fruits

Glycemic loads are per 100 grams of fruit weight.



GI GL
Fresh Fruits (100 g)

38 5.2
Apple

57 6.3
Apricot

50 4.3
Avocado

52 11.9
Banana

40 3.2
Berries

40 5.8
Blueberries

65 5.3
Cantaloupe (muskmelon)

22 3.5
Cherries, sweet (Queen Anne, Bing)

64 8.8
Currants

61 11.7
Fig

55 7.8
Fruit cocktail or mix (excluding citrus fruits)

55 7.6
Fruit cocktail or mix (including citrus fruits)

25 2.0
Grapefruit

46 7.9
Grapes, American type, slip skin

46 8.3
Grapes, European type, adherent skin

46 8.3
Grapes, NS as to type

65 5.9
Honeydew melon

53 7.8
Kiwi fruit

42 4.4
Nectarine

42 4.9
Orange

59 5.8
Papaya

42 4.0
Peach

38 5.9
Pear

38 4.0
Pear, Japanese

59 7.5
Pineapple

39 4.5
Plum

40 3.1
Strawberries

55 6.7
Strawberries, with sugar

42 4.9
Tangelo

42 5.6
Tangerine

72 5.4
Watermelon

Go to DietGrail.com Main Page.