Fruit Sugar Content of Fruits and Juices

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Food NameFruit SugarFS % BananaAll SugarsAS % Banana
Acerola juice, raw  4.537
Apples, raw, with skin5.912210.485
Apples, raw, without skin6.012410.183
Apples, raw, without skin, cooked, boiled  11.090
Apples, raw, without skin, cooked, microwave  11.695
Apples, canned, sweetened, sliced, drained, unheated  15.0123
Apples, canned, sweetened, sliced, drained, heated  14.8121
Apples, dehydrated (low moisture), sulfured, uncooked  81.1663
Apples, dried, sulfured, uncooked  57.2468
Apples, dried, sulfured, stewed, without added sugar  13.3109
Apple juice, canned or bottled, unsweetened, without added ascorbic acid5.71189.679
Apple juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, undiluted, without added ascorbic acid  38.8317
Apple juice, frozen concentrate, unsweetened, diluted with 3 volume water without added ascorbic acid  10.989
Applesauce, canned, unsweetened, without added ascorbic acid (includes USDA commodity)5.91219.477
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  • Nutrition data are calculated per 100g of food weight.
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  • Abbreviations: g = gram, mg = milligram, mcg = microgram, kcal = kilocalorie, kJ = kilojoule.









About This Fruit Sugar Database

This fruit sugar database provides the macronutrient as well as sucrose, glucose and fructose contents of hundreds of common fruits and fruit juices.
In addition, the database also provides the unique banana indices of fructose and total sugars of a food: fructose and total sugar contents of a food are compared to those in bananas. (Banana is chosen because it is one of the most common and popular fruits in the world.)
The indices are expressed in percentages. A fructose banana index of 50 % means that, ounce for ounce, the food's fructose content is half of banana's fructose content. These indices should make it easier to evaluate the fruit sugar and total sugars contents of a food than just some absolute numeric values.

Sugars

information from the National Institutes of Health

There are different types of sugars such as lactose, fructose, maltose, glucose, etc. By chemical structure, sugars are grouped into monosaccharides and disaccharides, and their sum equals total sugars.
Sugars are found naturally in many foods: lactose in milk and milk products, fructose in fruits, for example. Most of the sugar in the American diet is from sugars added during food processing and preparation, or at the table.

Fruit Sugar

Fruit sugar or fructose is the naturally occurring sugar in all fruits. It is also called levulose.

Fruit sugar also exists in foods not considered as fruits such as honey. Honey is a combination of fructose, glucose, and water, which is produced by bees. Each 100 grams of honey contains 41 grams of fruit sugar and 36 grams of glucose.

For individual sugars' content of nearly 8,000 common foods see: Fructose, Glucose, Sucrose Counter.

Is fruit sugar healthy?

Fructose or fruit sugar is more than twice as sweet as its isomer glucose. Use of high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks and other foods has been blamed for the epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States. One notable proponent of this theory is Dr. Robert Lustig, a professor at University of California at San Francisco. A more detailed discussion of his theory including an hour-long video can be seen here: Sugar, the Bitter Truth.

Among the metabolic dangers the anti-fructose scientists cite are an increase in abdominal fat, the type of fat associated with a greater risk of heart disease. Dr. Robert Lustig argues that fructose is so highly addictive it’s like alcohol without the buzz.

However, other researchers claim that fructose consumption leveled off around the year 2000 but obesity rates continue to rise and that so many things have happened in our environment in the past fifty years, from a total increase in calories to a decrease in activity, that it’s absurd to pin the entire obesity problem on a single food such as fructose or even sugar consumption as a whole according to David Klerfeld, a national program leader in Human Nutrition for the USDA.

Our Carb-Related Online Databases

See our most complete directory of Carbohydrate-Related Online Databases with nutrient data on fiber, starch, sugars, fructose, lactose, galactose, maltose, sucrose, glucose, complex carb and net carb calculators, foods with no carb as well as the largest online database of glycemic index and glycemic load of foods.

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Fruit Sugar Content of Common Fruits and Juices

Alphabetical list of fruit sugar content in common raw fruits.



Fruit Sugar (g)
Fruits or Juices (100 g)

3.8
Abiyuch

6.1
Apples, golden delicious, with skin

5.9
Apples, with skin

6.0
Apples, without skin

0.9
Apricots

0.1
Avocados, all commercial varieties

0.1
Avocados, California

0.3
Avocados, Florida

4.9
Bananas

2.4
Blackberries

5.0
Blueberries

6.3
Cherimoya

3.5
Cherries, sour, red

5.4
Cherries, sweet

1.6
Clementines

0.6
Cranberries

3.5
Currants, red and white

3.0
Feijoa

1.8
Grapefruit, pink and red, all areas

3.9
Grapes, muscadine

8.1
Grapes, red or green (European type, such as Thompson seedless)

9.2
Jackfruit

5.7
Kiwifruit, gold

4.4
Kiwifruit, green

1.1
Lemon juice

0.6
Lime juice

4.7
Mangos

1.9
Melons, cantaloupe

3.0
Melons, honeydew


Fruit Sugar (g)
Fruits or Juices (100 g)

1.4
Nectarines

2.3
Oranges, navels

3.7
Papayas

1.5
Peaches

6.4
Pears

6.8
Pears, bartlett

5.6
Persimmons, japanese

2.1
Pineapple, all varieties

2.2
Pineapple, extra sweet variety

1.9
Pineapple, traditional varieties

3.1
Plums

2.4
Raspberries

0.5
Rowal

7.7
Sapote, mamey

2.4
Strawberries

2.4
Tangerines, (mandarin oranges)

3.4
Watermelon