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Aluminum Content of Foods

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Food NameAluminum
Water, tap9.1
Beverage base, chocolate flavour, added minerals calcium & iron & vitamins A, B1, B2, C & D1225.0
Beverage, chocolate flavour, from base (Milo), with regular fat milk114.3
Soft drink, energy drink20.0
Biscuit, savoury, from white flour, plain snack cracker style239.0
Biscuit, savoury, cheese-flavoured354.0
Biscuit, savoury, flavoured725.0
Biscuit, sweet, plain393.0
Breakfast cereal, whole wheat, flakes, added dried fruit & nuts, added vitamins B1, B2, B3 & folate, Ca, Fe & fibre458.8
Breakfast cereal, wheat bran, flakes, sultanas, added vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 & folate, Fe & Zn406.0
Breakfast cereal, mixed grain flakes (wheat, oats), added dried fruit, added vitamins B1, B2, B3 & folate & Fe328.0
Breakfast cereal, beverage, all flavours, added vitamins A, B1, B2, C & folate90.1
Pizza, ham & pineapple, purchased frozen, baked204.0
Hamburger, plain (beef pattie, lettuce, tomato, onion, sauce), takeaway shop374.2
1234


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Aluminum

information from the National Institutes of Health

Aluminum (aluminium) is a nonessential metal to which humans are frequently exposed. Aluminum in the food supply comes from natural sources, water used in food preparation, food ingredients, and utensils used during food preparations. The amount of aluminum in the diet is small, compared with the amount of aluminum in antacids and some buffered analgesics. The healthy human body has effective barriers (skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract) to reduce the systemic absorption of aluminum ingested from water, foods, drugs, and air. The small amount of aluminum (<1%) that is systemically absorbed is excreted principally in the urine and, to a lesser extent, in the feces.

No reports of dietary aluminum toxicity to healthy individuals exist in the literature. Aluminum can be neurotoxic, when injected directly into the brains of animals and when accidentally introduced into human brains (by dialysis or shrapnel). A study from Canada reports cognitive and other neurological deficits among groups of workers occupationally exposed to dust containing high levels of aluminum. While the precise pathogenic role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains to be defined, present data do not support a causative role for aluminum in AD. High intake of aluminum from antacid for gastrointestinal ailments has not been reported to cause any adverse effects and has not been correlated with neurotoxicity or AD.

Foods and food ingredients are generally the major dietary sources of aluminum in the United States. Cooking in aluminum utensils often results in statistically significant, but relatively small, increases in aluminum content of food. Common aluminum-containing food ingredients are used mainly as preservatives, coloring agents, leavening agents, anticaking agents, etc. Safety evaluation and approval of these ingredients by the Food and Drug Administration indicate that these aluminum-containing compounds are safe for use in foods.

Aluminum in the diet and Alzheimer's disease

In recent years, interest in the potential role of metals in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has grown considerably. In particular, aluminum neurotoxicity was suggested after its discovery in the senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that represent the principal neuropathological hallmarks of AD.

Aluminum is omnipresent in everyday life and can enter the human body from several sources, most notably from drinking water and food consumption. The evidence supporting association from ingestion of aluminum from drinking water is somewhat stronger than for its ingestion from food. However, other elements present in drinking water, such as fluoride, copper, zinc, or iron could also have an effect on cognitive impairment or modify any aluminum neurotoxicity.

Some epidemiological studies, but not all, suggested that silica could be protective against aluminum damage, because it reduces oral absorption of aluminum and/or enhances aluminum excretion. Some epidemiological investigations suggested an association between chronic exposure to aluminum and risk of AD, although this relationship falls short of all the criteria generally attributed to causation.

Dietary and other sources of aluminium intake

Aluminium in the food supply comes from natural sources including water, food additives, and contamination by aluminium utensils and containers. Most unprocessed foods, except for certain herbs and tea leaves, contain low (< 5 micrograms Al/g) levels of aluminium. Thus most adults consume 1-10 mg aluminium daily from natural sources. Cooking in aluminium containers often results in statistically significant, but not practically important, increases in the aluminium content of foods. Intake of aluminium from food additives varies greatly (0 to 95 mg Al daily) among residents in North America, with the median intake for adults being about 24 mg daily. Generally, the intake of aluminium from foods is less than 1% of that consumed by individuals using aluminium-containing pharmaceuticals.

Currently the real scientific question is not the amount of aluminium in foods but the availability of the aluminium in foods and the sensitivity of some population groups to aluminium. Several dietary factors, including citrate, may affect the absorption of aluminium. Aluminium contamination of soy-based formulae when fed to premature infants with impaired kidney function and aluminium contamination of components of parenteral solutions (i.e. albumin, calcium and phosphorus salts) are of concern.

Foods High in Aluminum

Aluminum content is in mcg per 100 grams of food weight.



Aluminum
Foods that Contain Aluminum (100 g)

1225
Beverage base, chocolate flavor, added minerals calcium & iron & vitamins A, B1, B2, C & D

725
Biscuit, savoury, flavored

459
Breakfast cereal, whole wheat, flakes, added dried fruit & nuts, added vitamins B1, B2, B3 & folate, Ca,

Fe & fibre

435
Chocolate, milk, with added milk solids

406
Breakfast cereal, wheat bran, flakes, sultanas, added vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 & folate, Fe & Zn

393
Biscuit, sweet, plain

374
Hamburger, plain (beef pattie, lettuce, tomato, onion, sauce), takeaway shop

354
Biscuit, savoury, cheese-flavored

328
Breakfast cereal, mixed grain flakes (wheat, oats), added dried fruit, added vitamins B1, B2, B3 & folate

& Fe

281
Spread, yeast, vegemite

239
Biscuit, savoury, from white flour, plain snack cracker style

213
Kiwifruit, gold, peeled, raw

204
Pizza, ham & pineapple, purchased frozen, baked

161
Cheese, cheddar, processed, reduced fat (~8%), added vitamin D

161
Cheese, cheddar, processed, reduced fat (~16%), added vitamin D

116
Cheese, cheddar, regular fat

114
Beverage, chocolate flavor, from base (Milo), with regular fat milk

105
Chicken, breast, lean, grilled

90
Breakfast cereal, beverage, all flavors, added vitamins A, B1, B2, C & folate

75
Soy beverage, regular fat (~3%), chocolate flavored, added Ca & vitamins A, B1, B2 & B12

75
Soy beverage, regular fat (~3%), unflavored, added calcium

75
Soy beverage, regular fat (~3%), unflavored, unfortified

75
Soy beverage, regular fat (~ 3%), unflavored, added Ca, vitamins A, B1, B2 & B12

73
Soy beverage, reduced fat (~ 1.5%), chocolate flavored, added Ca & vitamins A, B1, B2 & B12

73
Soy beverage, reduced fat (~1% fat), unflavored, added Ca & vitamins A, B1, B2 & B12

73
Soy beverage, reduced fat (~ 1.5%), coffee flavored, added Ca & vitamins A, B1, B2 & B12

68
Oil, canola

65
Milk, rice, fluid, regular fat, added calcium


Aluminum
Foods that Contain Aluminum (100 g)

64
Venison, leg medallion, lean, dry fried

63
Oil, olive

63
Baked beans, canned in tomato sauce, salt reduced

63
Baked beans, canned in tomato sauce

56
Milk, cow, fluid, reduced fat (1.5%), added omega 3 polyunsaturates

56
Milk, cow, fluid, regular fat (3.5%), added omega 3 polyunsaturates

52
Venison, leg medallion, lean, raw

28
Venison, diced, lean, dry fried

25
Venison, stir fry strips, lean, dry fried

22
Venison, diced, lean, raw

20
Soft drink, energy drink

17
Venison, stir fry strips, lean, raw

16
Venison, mince, premium, dry fried

11
Venison, mince, premium, raw

9
Water, tap

6
Milk, cow, fluid, regular fat (~3.5%)

5
Milk, cow, fluid, reduced fat (1.5%), increased Ca, folate & vitamin D

5
Potato, pale skin, peeled, boiled

1
Egg, chicken, whole, omega-3 polyunsaturate enriched, boiled

1
Egg, chicken, whole, omega-3 polyunsaturate enriched, raw

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